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May 2011

Entries from April 2011

LUMA Loyola University Museum of Art

LUMA Loyola University Museum of Art.
Saturday, May 21 
Everyday Art: The Islamic Impact on American Arts 
3:00 p.m. 
Free with museum admission 
American popular culture reflects the cultural diversity of the American people and helps to shape the way Americans understand themselves. Perhaps the least understood of these influences is the cultural impact of the various Muslim communities that have settled in the United States. The tapestry of influences that converge in popular music, architecture, and literature-the arts we engage with every day-bears witness to the presence of Muslims in America. In this richly illustrated talk, Dr. Hussein Rashid explores the Islamic impact on American popular culture using examples from communities and eras throughout American history. 
RSVP to luma@luc.edu or 312.915.7608.

Islamic traditions influence American architecture, culture, says speaker - Daily Campus - News

Islamic traditions influence American architecture, culture, says speaker - Daily Campus - News.
Although it seems that Arab presence in America is recent, Dr. Hussein Rashid would argue to the contrary. In his lecture, "Everyday Art: the Islamic Contribution on American Arts," Rashid argues that America has a long tradition of Islamic influence in art and culture.

Speaking Event: SMU and UT-Arlington Apr. 21

UT-Arlington Press Release

The University of Texas at Arlington’s College of Liberal Arts and School of Architecture will welcome Hussein Rashid, visiting Professor at Virginia Theological Seminary, to the campus next week for a discussion on “Everyday Art: Islamic Contribution to American Arts.”

Rashid will explore the Islamic impact on American popular culture using examples from multiple communities and time periods throughout American history.

SMU Press Release

Perkins School of Theology at Southern Methodist University welcomes Dr. Hussein Rashid, visiting Professor at Virginia Theological Seminary, for an Islamic Art and Culture Forum on Thursday, April 21, at 1:30 p.m. “Everyday Art: Islamic Contribution to American Arts” is a richly illustrated talk by Dr. Rashid, exploring the Islamic impact on American popular culture using examples from multiple communities and time periods throughout American history. The event will be held in the Elizabeth Perkins Prothro Great Hall of Perkins School of Theology on the SMU campus. Media interviews are welcomed at 1:00 p.m., immediately preceding the seminar.

Dallas Morning News Coverage

An Islamic Art and Culture Forum on “Everyday Art: Islamic Contribution to American Arts” will be offered in two sessions on April 21. The first will be at 1:30 p.m. at Southern Methodist University’s Elizabeth Perkins Prothro Hall, 5901 Bishop Blvd. in Dallas. The second will be at 6 p.m. in the University of Texas at Arlington’s Architecture Building, 601 W. Nedderman Drive in Arlington. The Aga Khan Council for Northern Texas in partnership with the two universities is presenting the forum. The speaker will be Dr. Hussein Rashid, a visiting professor at Virginia Theological Seminary. Reservations are required by Friday. Call 972-446-5605, ext. 221, or email rsvpcouncil nt@usainstitutions.org.

Islamic Art and Culture Forum - Dr. Hussein Rashid - SMU

Islamic Art and Culture Forum - Dr. Hussein Rashid - SMU.
Perkins School of Theology at Southern Methodist University welcomes Dr. Hussein Rashid, visiting Professor at Virginia Theological Seminary, for an Islamic Art and Culture Forum on Thursday, April 21, at 1:30 p.m. “Everyday Art: Islamic Contribution to American Arts” is a richly illustrated talk by Dr. Rashid, exploring the Islamic impact on American popular culture using examples from multiple communities and time periods throughout American history. The event will be held in the Elizabeth Perkins Prothro Great Hall of Perkins School of Theology on the SMU campus. Media interviews are welcomed at 1:00 p.m., immediately preceding the seminar.

Speaking Event: Harvard - Comics and Muslim Identity, April 30, 2011

The final two events in our year of programming around comics, graphic novels, the Middle East and Muslim communities will be happening at the end of the month!

The panel event on Saturday, April 30th from 10:00 – 2:00 on the Harvard Divinity School campus will bring together scholars engaging with the intersections between comics and Muslim identity from a variety of vantage points. See more information here.

The afternoon and evening preceding the panel we will be running, with the Prince Alwaleed Bin Talal Islamic Studies Program, and open comic making workshop from 11:00am – 4:00pm (See more information here). The goal of this workshop is to engage Harvard students and Boston community members in sharing and communicating their experiences living, traveling, learning, and teaching about the Middle East region and / or Muslim identity through comics arts. We will additionally be Skyping with grassroots and independent comics artists in the Middle East region to learn more about their process and projects.

Graphic Novels and the Middle East Website

Comics and Muslim Identity Flyer


The Ismaili: Video: The Islamic impact on American arts

The Ismaili: Video: The Islamic impact on American arts.
Dr Hussein Rashid delivered a lecture titled Everyday Art: An Islamic Impact on American Art on 13 February 2011 at the Michael C. Carlos Museum of Emory University in Atlanta, Georgia. In the talk, Dr Rashid highlights Islamic influences on popular art in America — from architecture and popular media to poetry and writing — by the likes of Ralph Waldo Emerson, in his From Persian of Hafiz II, to Toni Morrison’s portrayal of Muslim characters in her novel Beloved. The lecture followed two exhibitions on Islamic calligraphy at the museum.