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Entries from November 2018

Flattening Faith: Searching for 3-Dimensional Religion in 2-Dimensional Fiction Tickets, Thu, Nov 29, 2018 at 6:00 PM | Eventbrite

Flattening Faith: Searching for 3-Dimensional Religion in 2-Dimensional Fiction Tickets, Thu, Nov 29, 2018 at 6:00 PM | Eventbrite.
Imaginary worlds extend and expand our visions of what is possible. In these worlds, we can fly with dragons or shoot lightning from our fingertips. Yet, this expansiveness does not always apply to the religious lives of the characters populating our narratives. Religion can be made flat, so that the lived religious experiences and ideals of characters are signified by objects: head coverings, prayer beads, or feathers. As a result, both the religion and practitioner are not fully realized. Conversely, imaginary worlds can add depth and nuance to religions that have been flattened in real life. This panel explores the tensions of how religion is (re)presented in fiction and in real life, and how it is actually practiced by adherents.

Islam in America: What you don't know about Islam's U.S. roots

Islam in America: What you don't know about Islam's U.S. roots.
"A lot of people might assume Muslim immigration started in 1965 when the U.S. had a period of immigration reform, others will date it back to the 1979 Islamic revolution in Iran, yet others to the 9/11 attacks, but usually no one looks farther back than the 1960s and certainly not beyond the 20th century for this history at the popular level," said Hussein Rashid, who teaches at Columbia University.

Course: Two Faiths, Two Scriptures, One God: The Torah and the Quran | The Temple Emanu-El Streicker Center | New York City

Two Faiths, Two Scriptures, One God: The Torah and the Quran | The Temple Emanu-El Streicker Center | New York City.
Muslims and Jews have a long history of interaction both in Europe and the Middle East — and that interaction hasn’t always been hostile. After all, like the Torah, the Muslim holy book, the Quran, tells the stories of Adam and Eve, Abraham, Joseph, Moses and Noah, and contains many parallel or echoing passages. What are the differences between these various accounts?  How might we understand the common origins of these stories?  How does examining the two approaches help us gain greater understanding of both Judaism and Islam?