“On Common Ground”: CIW, faith leaders come together in NYC for “an extraordinary conversation”… – Coalition of Immokalee Workers

“On Common Ground”: CIW, faith leaders come together in NYC for “an extraordinary conversation”… – Coalition of Immokalee Workers.

Hussein reflected a bit on human rights as that which we owe one another but “from a faith perspective, human dignity is vouchsafed by the divine, it is something is inherent and promised to us, over which we have no agency except to forget that we have it.  And that’s an important way to think through, ‘How do we assure dignity?'”
Appreciating the expertise that farmworkers brought to creating the Fair Food Program’s human rights solution and how important it is to resist challenges to such expertise Hussein continued, “People say ‘who are you to say what it is that you need? How do you know what you need when you haven’t studied it?’  These are questions of performance that take away from human dignity.  As a child of immigrants, as a person of color, as a Muslim in this country, I know that these goal posts are always moving.  I have got a bachelor’s degree and three graduate degrees from Harvard and it’s not good enough.”

Panel on 28 January 2019 on farmworkers' rights

I’ll be speaking on a panel on Jan. 28 on food workers’ rights. 
 
"On Monday, January 28 join us at the Church of St. Ignatius Loyola in NYC as we explore the vital connection between faith and the advancement of human rights through a panel discussion with the Coalition of Immokalee Workers’ Gerardo Reyes-Chavez, theologians Brian McLaren, Obery Hendricks, and Hussein Rashid, Rachel Kahn-Troster of T’ruah and moderated by Noelle Damico of the Alliance for Fair Food!


Today tens of thousands of farmworkers in seven states are harvesting free from slavery, sexual violence, and fear through the Fair Food Program which Harvard Business Review called “among the most important social impact stories of the past century.”  Now the program’s model is being translated to supply chains around the world.”

 
 
The event is free and open to the public.
 
On Common Ground Jan 28 flyer

Watch This Animated Tale of 'The Secret History of Muslims in the U.S.' | Colorlines

Watch This Animated Tale of 'The Secret History of Muslims in the U.S.' | Colorlines.
Islamophobic fearmongering about Muslims in the United States ignores the ways they have influenced the country from its inception. Dr. Hussein Rashid, a professor of religion at Barnard College, chronicles this history from 1492 to today in an animated short from The New York Times yesterday (December 17)

Flattening Faith: Searching for 3-Dimensional Religion in 2-Dimensional Fiction Tickets, Thu, Nov 29, 2018 at 6:00 PM | Eventbrite

Flattening Faith: Searching for 3-Dimensional Religion in 2-Dimensional Fiction Tickets, Thu, Nov 29, 2018 at 6:00 PM | Eventbrite.
Imaginary worlds extend and expand our visions of what is possible. In these worlds, we can fly with dragons or shoot lightning from our fingertips. Yet, this expansiveness does not always apply to the religious lives of the characters populating our narratives. Religion can be made flat, so that the lived religious experiences and ideals of characters are signified by objects: head coverings, prayer beads, or feathers. As a result, both the religion and practitioner are not fully realized. Conversely, imaginary worlds can add depth and nuance to religions that have been flattened in real life. This panel explores the tensions of how religion is (re)presented in fiction and in real life, and how it is actually practiced by adherents.

Islam in America: What you don't know about Islam's U.S. roots

Islam in America: What you don't know about Islam's U.S. roots.
"A lot of people might assume Muslim immigration started in 1965 when the U.S. had a period of immigration reform, others will date it back to the 1979 Islamic revolution in Iran, yet others to the 9/11 attacks, but usually no one looks farther back than the 1960s and certainly not beyond the 20th century for this history at the popular level," said Hussein Rashid, who teaches at Columbia University.

Course: Two Faiths, Two Scriptures, One God: The Torah and the Quran | The Temple Emanu-El Streicker Center | New York City

Two Faiths, Two Scriptures, One God: The Torah and the Quran | The Temple Emanu-El Streicker Center | New York City.
Muslims and Jews have a long history of interaction both in Europe and the Middle East — and that interaction hasn’t always been hostile. After all, like the Torah, the Muslim holy book, the Quran, tells the stories of Adam and Eve, Abraham, Joseph, Moses and Noah, and contains many parallel or echoing passages. What are the differences between these various accounts?  How might we understand the common origins of these stories?  How does examining the two approaches help us gain greater understanding of both Judaism and Islam?

Faith in Fantasy on Imaginary Worlds Podcast

I am a longtime fan of the Imaginary Worlds podcast, and was ecstatic was I was asked to participate in roundtable on the role of faith in imaginary worlds.

I was joined by friend of many years, the Velveteen Rabbi, Rachel Barenblat, who did a wonderful write-up of her experience here.

The episode description is:

Science fiction has not always been compatible with religion -- in fact many futuristic settings imagine no religion at all. But sci-fi and fantasy have long fascinated people of different faiths because the genres wrestle with the big questions of life.

You can listen to episode embedded below, or on the podcast page here.

 


9/11, Its Lingering Effects On US Policies, And Trump | News | teleSUR English

9/11, Its Lingering Effects On US Policies, And Trump | News | teleSUR English.
The U.S. Supreme Court upheld the government’s ban, albeit a narrower version of its predecessors, further vilifying Muslims and legitimizing their discrimination. 
Hussein Rashid, professor of religion at Columbia University, says that the ruling wasn’t surprising in that it has often ruled “in favor of discrimination.” 
However, the highest court’s decision highlights that particularly since the 1978 Iranian Revolution and the 9/11 attacks, “Muslims have been “racialized”: bound together and stereotyped, instilling an idea of Muslims as a foreign threat and brown-skinned,” that includes anyone from South Asia or the Arab world, wrote Rashid after the ruling.