Entries categorized "Events"

Spoleto's Exploring Omar discussion series is a free companion to this year's new opera | Spoleto Buzz

Spoleto's Exploring Omar discussion series is a free companion to this year's new opera | Spoleto Buzz.
On Thurs. March 12 head to the Main Library at 6 p.m. for: Islam and Enslaved Africans in Early Charleston. Brenda Tindal of the International African American Museum moderates a discussion between Charleston County Public Library's historian Nic Butler and The New Schools' professor Hussein Rashid. This year the city celebrates 350 years, which makes it an apt time to discuss all of the city's history, including the influences of enslaved Africans on the introduction of Islam to the Lowcountry.

Do We Still Need Faith in the 21st Century? | The Greene Space

Do We Still Need Faith in the 21st Century? | The Greene Space.

Belief without evidence, that’s faith. It’s the cornerstone of religion. For many, it is a centering force that’s essential for navigating life’s mysteries and challenges. But for others, ever-increasing access to information, science, advanced technology has meant a loss of faith, or at least a reckoning with what it means.

Smithsonian Events - Smithsonian Jazz Masterworks Orchestra presents "Islam and Modern Jazz" - December 8, 2019, 7:30 – 9:30pm EST

Smithsonian Events - Smithsonian Jazz Masterworks Orchestra presents "Islam and Modern Jazz" - December 8, 2019, 7:30 – 9:30pm EST.
The undeniable link between Islam and jazz music led one critic to proclaim that the faith was the "unofficial religion of bebop." Alongside early converts such as William Evans (Yusef Lateef), Frederick Russell Jones (Ahmad Jamal), Leo Morris (Idris Muhammad), and Art Blakey (Abdullah Ibn Buhaina), many jazz musicians discovered a spiritual foundation that inspired strength and dignity through Islam. From Eastern modes to Western melodies, the impact of Islam on the soul of American jazz ranks second only to that of Southern black churches. In the big band format, the Smithsonian Jazz Masterworks Orchestra will present a program of jazz created, performed, and inspired by practitioners of Islam. 
Join us for a pre-concert talk by Hussein Rashid, PhD, lecturer at The New School, and founder of islamicate, a consultancy focusing on religious literacy and cultural competency. This concert is part of the Sounds of Faith series, examining the religious roots of American musical traditions. 
Sounds of Faith programming is made possible by the generous support of Lilly Endowment Inc.

Rabbi Schoolman & Dr. Rashid: Two Prophets, Two Faiths Tickets in New York, NY, United States

Rabbi Schoolman & Dr. Rashid: Two Prophets, Two Faiths Tickets in New York, NY, United States.
Two iconic figures in the Torah, Abraham and Moses, are depicted as prophets in the Quran. We will delve into the differences in the way these two personalities emerge in Jewish and Islamic scripture, what similarities they share and what we can learn about the differences between Islam and Judaism from those depictions. 

Wilbur Awards to celebrate 70 years in Chicago, winners announced for 2019 - Religion News Service

Wilbur Awards to celebrate 70 years in Chicago, winners announced for 2019 - Religion News Service.
Documentary (up to 30 min.) “The Secret History of Muslims in the US,”  Zeyba Rahman, Hussein Rashid, Joshua Seftel, Negin Farsad, Maria Stanisheva; Doris Duke Foundation for Islamic Art, Smartypants Pictures & Animadocs, Brooklyn, New York

“On Common Ground”: CIW, faith leaders come together in NYC for “an extraordinary conversation”… – Coalition of Immokalee Workers

“On Common Ground”: CIW, faith leaders come together in NYC for “an extraordinary conversation”… – Coalition of Immokalee Workers.

Hussein reflected a bit on human rights as that which we owe one another but “from a faith perspective, human dignity is vouchsafed by the divine, it is something is inherent and promised to us, over which we have no agency except to forget that we have it.  And that’s an important way to think through, ‘How do we assure dignity?'”
Appreciating the expertise that farmworkers brought to creating the Fair Food Program’s human rights solution and how important it is to resist challenges to such expertise Hussein continued, “People say ‘who are you to say what it is that you need? How do you know what you need when you haven’t studied it?’  These are questions of performance that take away from human dignity.  As a child of immigrants, as a person of color, as a Muslim in this country, I know that these goal posts are always moving.  I have got a bachelor’s degree and three graduate degrees from Harvard and it’s not good enough.”

Panel on 28 January 2019 on farmworkers' rights

I’ll be speaking on a panel on Jan. 28 on food workers’ rights. 
 
"On Monday, January 28 join us at the Church of St. Ignatius Loyola in NYC as we explore the vital connection between faith and the advancement of human rights through a panel discussion with the Coalition of Immokalee Workers’ Gerardo Reyes-Chavez, theologians Brian McLaren, Obery Hendricks, and Hussein Rashid, Rachel Kahn-Troster of T’ruah and moderated by Noelle Damico of the Alliance for Fair Food!


Today tens of thousands of farmworkers in seven states are harvesting free from slavery, sexual violence, and fear through the Fair Food Program which Harvard Business Review called “among the most important social impact stories of the past century.”  Now the program’s model is being translated to supply chains around the world.”

 
 
The event is free and open to the public.
 
On Common Ground Jan 28 flyer

Flattening Faith: Searching for 3-Dimensional Religion in 2-Dimensional Fiction Tickets, Thu, Nov 29, 2018 at 6:00 PM | Eventbrite

Flattening Faith: Searching for 3-Dimensional Religion in 2-Dimensional Fiction Tickets, Thu, Nov 29, 2018 at 6:00 PM | Eventbrite.
Imaginary worlds extend and expand our visions of what is possible. In these worlds, we can fly with dragons or shoot lightning from our fingertips. Yet, this expansiveness does not always apply to the religious lives of the characters populating our narratives. Religion can be made flat, so that the lived religious experiences and ideals of characters are signified by objects: head coverings, prayer beads, or feathers. As a result, both the religion and practitioner are not fully realized. Conversely, imaginary worlds can add depth and nuance to religions that have been flattened in real life. This panel explores the tensions of how religion is (re)presented in fiction and in real life, and how it is actually practiced by adherents.